How to Negotiate a Land Contract Vs. a Mortgage

by Renee Marie Jordan 08/15/2021

Image by Shutterbug75 from Pixabay

With a mortgage, a buyer is applying for financing to purchase the property in its entirety. They're relying on their credit and assets for approval before assuming responsibility of the full property. In a land contract, you're cutting out the need for a formal lender and relying on the seller to approve or deny your application.

The seeming simplicity of the transaction may make some people discount the importance of negotiation. However, there are a few things to keep in mind so both the buyer and seller are comfortable with the terms of the agreement. 

Talk to the Seller 

With a land contract, you may be more beholden to the seller than you would be to a lender in a traditional mortgage. If the seller thinks of you as a tenant rather than an owner of the place, you'll need to discuss their exact involvement over the course of the contract.

Because the seller won't receive the full value of the property upon sale, their financial insecurity is entirely understandable. They may want to check up with you over the phone, in-person, or through a third-party. If you're uncomfortable with the level of oversight, you may need to speak up or find a different property. 

Make sure you understand your obligations during this time. Some buyers are treated as a renter of the property — until it comes time to make significant and costly repairs. If you're responsible for all upkeep, you may be able to negotiate more freedom in exchange for the additional expense. 

Think Through the Finances 

One of the starkest differences between a traditionally financed home and a land contract is the speed of repayments. Even if you do find a seller willing to extend the contract, it can still be a major strain on your finances. As you factor in your current assets and credit score, you should also consider the future.

If the final payment is large enough, it may still require a substantial loan. If your credit hasn't improved enough by the time the contract nears the end, it could be a significant blow to your savings. And if you can't meet the terms of the contract, the seller will get to keep the money you've already paid them (as well as the property). 

Negotiating a land contract means thinking through the repercussions of each clause. While the terms may seem looser than a standard mortgage, there may be strings attached that aren't as obvious at first glance. Ensure that you understand your financial and practical responsibilities before signing on the dotted line. 

About the Author
Author

Renee Marie Jordan

Renee Marie Jordan is a Third Generation Realtor®, who started out her career in residential lending. Jordan Real Estate was established by her grandmother, Jean Kotwitz, who was one of the first female real estate brokers in Solano County! The company was then passed down to her mother, Diane Jordan, over 40 years ago. Renee Marie then took over the company 24 years ago and in 2015 joined forces with RE/MAX Gold.   

Regarded as one of Northern California’s most dependable brokers, Renee Marie has gained industry respect for creating a successful brokerage company. Renee Marie’s unique blend of negotiating expertise, innovative thinking and belief that the client always comes first, has resulted in an extensive client base with many satisfied homeowners. Renee Marie specializes in residential sales, first time buyers, short sale properties, luxury properties, investment properties, foreclosures, 1031 exchanges, and has been the HUD specialist for Solano County since 2009.   

Renee Marie gets to the heart of her clients wants and needs. She attributes a great deal of her success to the many referrals she receives from clients who appreciate the care and thoughtfulness she puts into every transaction. Friends and family members can count on the same excellent service when they are referred to Renee Marie.